Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Math That Moves: Schools Embrace the iPad

An interesting article about schools experimenting with iPads:

The iPads cost $750 apiece, and they are to be used in class and at home during the school year to replace textbooks, allow students to correspond with teachers and turn in papers and homework assignments, and preserve a record of student work in digital portfolios.

"It allows us to extend the classroom beyond these four walls," said Larry Reiff, an English teacher at Roslyn who now posts all his course materials online.

Technological fads have come and gone in schools, and other experiments meant to rev up the educational experience for children raised on video games and YouTube have had mixed results. Educators, for instance, are still divided over whether initiatives to give every student a laptop have made a difference academically.

At a time when school districts are trying to get their budgets approved so they do not have to lay off teachers or cut programs, spending money on tablet computers may seem like an extravagance.

And some parents and scholars have raised concerns that schools are rushing to invest in them before their educational value has been proved by research.

"There is very little evidence that kids learn more, faster or better by using these machines," said Larry Cuban, a professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, who believes that the money would be better spent to recruit, train and retain teachers. "IPads are marvelous tools to engage kids, but then the novelty wears off and you get into hard-core issues of teaching and learning."

But school leaders say the iPad is not just a cool new toy but rather a powerful and versatile tool with a multitude of applications, including thousands with educational uses.


Math That Moves: Schools Embrace the iPad

Published: January 4, 2011

ROSLYN HEIGHTS, N.Y. — As students returned to class this week, some

 Subscribe in a reader