Tuesday, July 05, 2011

How to Land Your Kid in Therapy

As the parent of 15, 12, and 9-year-old girls, and one who would to do anything for them, this article is sobering – perhaps one can do TOO much (now I don't feel so badly about the occasional a**-kicking I do!):

But after working with these patients over time, I came to believe that no florid denial or distortion was going on. They truly did seem to have caring and loving parents, parents who gave them the freedom to "find themselves" and the encouragement to do anything they wanted in life. Parents who had driven carpools, and helped with homework each night, and intervened when there was a bully at school or a birthday invitation not received, and had gotten them tutors when they struggled in math, and music lessons when they expressed an interest in guitar (but let them quit when they lost that interest), and talked through their feelings when they broke the rules, instead of punishing them ("logical consequences" always stood in for punishment). In short, these were parents who had always been "attuned," as we therapists like to say, and had made sure to guide my patients through any and all trials and tribulations of childhood. As an overwhelmed parent myself, I'd sit in session and secretly wonder how these fabulous parents had done it all.

Until, one day, another question occurred to me: Was it possible these parents had done too much?

Here I was, seeing the flesh-and-blood results of the kind of parenting that my peers and I were trying to practice with our own kids, precisely so that they wouldn't end up on a therapist's couch one day. We were running ourselves ragged in a herculean effort to do right by our kids—yet what seemed like grown-up versions of them were sitting in our offices, saying they felt empty, confused, and anxious. Back in graduate school, the clinical focus had always been on how the lack of parental attunement affects the child. It never occurred to any of us to ask, what if the parents are too attuned? What happens to those kids?


How to Land Your Kid in Therapy

Why the obsession with our kids' happiness may be dooming them to unhappy adulthoods. A therapist and mother reports.

By Lori Gottlieb, The Atlantic


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