Saturday, October 15, 2016

Roger Lowenstein on the important ballot initiative on charter schools in MA

Roger Lowenstein on the important ballot initiative on charter schools in MA:

These students have big plans for the future—including college. And why not? They are learning twice as fast as their peers in traditional schools, on average. According to a 2013 study by Stanford University's Center for Research on Education Outcomes, Boston charter students "gain an additional 12 months in reading and 13 months in math per school year." Remarkably, African-Americans in the city's charters are progressing faster than white students at traditional public schools. 

Such results have made Massachusetts ground zero for the national charter debate. Due to state laws limiting charter-school capacity, 32,000 kids—most of them poor minorities—languish on waiting lists. This year the state legislature tried to craft a compromise to ease the restrictions but failed. Now it's up to voters: A referendum on the November ballot would authorize the state to open as many as 12 new charters each year, adding to the roughly 70 in operation now.

In one sense, the ballot measure, known as Question 2, has already proved a boon: Money is pouring in. Pro-charter groups and individuals, including former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, have contributed more than $12 million to pass it, according to financial reports filed with the state. Local unions and the American Federation of Teachers have raised about $6.8 million to defeat it. By comparison, a ballot item to legalize pot has smoked out only $3 million.

A Bay State Referendum on Charter Schools

Boston's charter-school students are learning twice as fast as their peers. Why vote against more charters?

Posting admission by lottery results at a charter school in Boston. Photo: Boston Globe via Getty Images
By Roger Lowenstein 
WSJ, Sept. 26, 2016 7:34 p.m. ET 

 Subscribe in a reader