Sunday, December 28, 2014

Colleges that pledged to help poor families have been doing the opposite

How depressing:

As institutions vie for income and prestige in this way, the net prices they're charging the lowest-income students, after discounts and financial aid, continue to rise faster on average than the net prices they're charging higher-income ones, according to an analysis of newly released data the universities and colleges are required to report to the U.S. Department of Education.

This includes the 100 higher-education institutions whose leaders attended a widely publicized White House summit in January and promised to expand the opportunities for low-income students to go to college. In fact, the private universities in that group collectively raised what the poorest families pay by 10 percent, compared to 5 percent for wealthier students, according to the analysis by The Dallas Morning News and The Hechinger Report based on information the U.S. Department of Education released this month covering 2008-09 to 2012-13, the most recent period available.

Not only did the White House pledge schools raise their net prices faster for the poorest than for higher-income families on a percentage basis, the new figures show; nearly a third increased the actual dollar amount more quickly for their lowest-income than their higher-income students.

November 30, 2014

Colleges that pledged to help poor families have been doing the opposite, new figures show

Colleges continue to put burden of price hikes on poorest

 Subscribe in a reader