Monday, November 22, 2010

Teaching for America

A fantastic op ed in today's NYT by Tom Friedman:

When I came to Washington in 1988, the cold war was ending and the hot beat was national security and the State Department. If I were a cub reporter today, I'd still want to be covering the epicenter of national security — but that would be the Education Department. President Obama got this one exactly right when he said that whoever "out-educates us today is going to out-compete us tomorrow." The bad news is that for years now we've been getting out-educated. The good news is that cities, states and the federal government are all fighting back. But have no illusions. We're in a hole.

Here are few data points that the secretary of education, Arne Duncan, offered in a Nov. 4 speech: "One-quarter of U.S. high school students drop out or fail to graduate on time. Almost one million students leave our schools for the streets each year. ... One of the more unusual and sobering press conferences I participated in last year was the release of a report by a group of top retired generals and admirals. Here was the stunning conclusion of their report: 75 percent of young Americans, between the ages of 17 to 24, are unable to enlist in the military today because they have failed to graduate from high school, have a criminal record, or are physically unfit." America's youth are now tied for ninth in the world in college attainment.

"Other folks have passed us by, and we're paying a huge price for that economically," added Duncan in an interview. "Incremental change isn't going to get us where we need to go. We've got to be much more ambitious. We've got to be disruptive. You can't keep doing the same stuff and expect different results."

Duncan, with bipartisan support, has begun several initiatives to energize reform — particularly his Race to the Top competition with federal dollars going to states with the most innovative reforms to achieve the highest standards. Maybe his biggest push, though, is to raise the status of the teaching profession. Why?

His last paragraph is spot on as well:

All good ideas, but if we want better teachers we also need better parents — parents who turn off the TV and video games, make sure homework is completed, encourage reading and elevate learning as the most important life skill. The more we demand from teachers the more we have to demand from students and parents. That's the Contract for America that will truly ensure our national security.


November 20, 2010

Teaching for America


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