Friday, July 22, 2011

Law School Economics: Ka-Ching!

This article about law school tuition and economics horrified me – it's what's happening to colleges, but MUCH worse:

WITH apologies to show business, there's no business like the business of law school.

The basic rules of a market economy — even golden oldies, like a link between supply and demand — just don't apply.

Legal diplomas have such allure that law schools have been able to jack up tuition four times faster than the soaring cost of college. And many law schools have added students to their incoming classes — a step that, for them, means almost pure profits — even during the worst recession in the legal profession's history.

It is one of the academy's open secrets: law schools toss off so much cash they are sometimes required to hand over as much as 30 percent of their revenue to universities, to subsidize less profitable fields.

In short, law schools have the power to raise prices and expand in ways that would make any company drool. And when a business has that power, it is apparently difficult to resist.

How difficult? For a sense, take a look at the strange case of New York Law School and its dean, Richard A. Matasar. For more than a decade, Mr. Matasar has been one of the legal academy's most dogged and scolding critics, and he has repeatedly urged professors and fellow deans to rethink the basics of the law school business model and put the interests of students first.

"What I've said to people in giving talks like this in the past is, we should be ashamed of ourselves," Mr. Matasar said at a 2009 meeting of the Association of American Law Schools. He ended with a challenge: If a law school can't help its students achieve their goals, "we should shut the damn place down."

Given his scathing critiques, you might expect that during Mr. Matasar's 11 years as dean, he has reshaped New York Law School to conform with his reformist agenda. But he hasn't. Instead, the school seems to be benefitting from many of legal education's assorted perversities.

N.Y.L.S. is ranked in the bottom third of all law schools in the country, but with tuition and fees now set at $47,800 a year, it charges more than Harvard. It increased the size of the class that arrived in the fall of 2009 by an astounding 30 percent, even as hiring in the legal profession imploded. It reported in the most recent US News & World Report rankings that the median starting salary of its graduates was the same as for those of the best schools in the nation — even though most of its graduates, in fact, find work at less than half that amount.


Law School Economics: Ka-Ching!

Published: July 16, 2011 

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